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Posts Tagged ‘Letterpress Script Cards’

Susan Stripling is a wedding photographer whose astonishingly beautiful images, skill, inspired imagination and devotion to the craft have landed her in the midst of some of the most amazing nuptials ever. She just had Studio Z Mendocino do her new business cards and stationery. Susan has photographed weddings throughout the US, the Caribbean, South America, Finland, France, and the Bahamas. She’s been published in Inside Weddings, Martha Stewart Weddings, Grace Ormonde Wedding Style, Bride and Bloom, Modern Bride, The Knot, Professional Photographer Magazine, The New York Times Style section, Rangerfinder Magazine, Capture Magazine, Elegant Bride, in Trade Publications for Nikon USA, and Town and Country Weddings. Susan’s teaching career has developed as well; she has been seen at past Digital Wedding Forum conventions, gives private and group workshops throughout the USA, and has spoken at WPPI. Busy Susan, had Infinet Design devise her double-S monogram and we foil stamped it in gold onto her lux stationery wardrobe: business cards on very thickest Cranes Lettra 600 gram cover stock, and script cards in the same ultra-thick paper (think thank you notes, quick messages accompanying samples, etc., etc.) that fit into spectacular Cranes number ten envelopes with rather monumental square flaps. This is the blockbuster envelope we love to stuff:

Here is the script card:

Because it is foiled in a single color, with the monogram/logo on the front of the business card and only the website address on the back, overall costs were kept to a minimum, but the finished pieces carry all the gorgeousness and panache anyone could possibly desire.

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Muffy Mead-Ferro came to Studio Z Mendocino for personal stationery, wanting to find an image of Indian Paintbrush, Wyoming’s state flower, to use as their motif. We looked and looked for something charming and appropriate, but were unable to dig up any already-existing art for this purpose. Instead of stressing out about it, Muffy hired an artist she knew to draw something special for her alone. He came up with this elegant rendering in two colors, which we adapted for letterpress by having two wood-mounted magnesium plates made. What you see above is Muffy’s card laid atop one of those printing plates. As you can see, this is the green plate. Another plate, with the same crop marks on the corners, bears the crimson part, and that red goes on the press as a second run. This is something people often don’t understand about Letterpress, that each color is a separate run through the press. Of course, this makes things a bit more expensive, but we think the loveliness is worth every cent.

We use the crop marks to register the colors to each other, positioning the exactly-matching crop marks so that they fall on top of each other on each press sheet. We also print the front and back of the cards on the same press sheet, at the same time, then “work and turn” them. That means once the first side is dry, we flip them over and print the other side. Then we chop them apart on our big guillotine cutter, again using those ubiquitous crop marks that show where the cutting will take place, which results in  a bunch of two-sided cards, kind of like magic. This saves you money by allowing the same number of colors on front and back without an extra charge. Also kind of magical.

We printed Muffy’s stationery: small sized folding cards with the Indian Paintbrush image on the front, and her name, of course, and also letterpress printed a repeating pattern of the reduced Indian Paintbrush image on the envelope lining. They are very special, and I’m sorry I don’t have a picture of them to put up here. Check back later — maybe I will take one and post it soon. When we eventually did the calling cards, which she needed for her Wyoming address, we used the same motif, printing it onto 600 gram Cranes Lettra, our favorite premium, extra-thick, ultra-chic paper stock. As you can see, Muffy’s cards stand out in a crowd.

If you have a favorite image or motif that is dear to your heart, we often can adapt things like that to letterpress requirements. Even a photograph can be made into a high contrast image and used to enhance one’s business or calling cards. Ask us about our design services, typographic expertise, and ways we can translate your design dreams onto actual paper things you can mail and hand out. We are really good at magic!

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JennAffairs salmon-edged black business cards. Photos by Pablo Abuliak.

The first question many people ask me is,  ‘How much will my new logo and business card cost?” This is a loaded question. More to the point, what do you want these things to do for you? What is it worth if it is so powerful that it increases your business? The second question many people ask is, “How long will it take to make me a new logo?” Super loaded question. Sometimes it takes one minute. Other times it takes a year and a half.

In the case of Jennifer Chapman, South Carolina entrepreneur extraordinaire and total new BFF, the more pressing question was the second one. How long. Jenn had found my website and loved what she saw there. Her dilemma was that her fabulous new Charleston showroom location was opening in a few weeks and she still had not found The New Branding. What could I do and how fast. After talking to Jenn for not very long, I was hooked. We decided on a price for the work and to tell you the truth, I was stumped. I wanted to do a monogram but “J” and “A” are really hard letters to put together in an artistic way. What to do? She needed these fast and she would also need a rack card or brochure to take to a big show she had signed up for. All within two weeks. Could I pull this rabbit out of this hat?

A couple of nights later I woke up in the middle of the night with this arrangement of letters in my dream. JA! OMG. I drew it in the notebook I keep next to me at all times and in the morning executed it on my computer and sent a PDF to Jenn. She was mad for it almost immediately. I had the idea to put it on black, super-thick museum mount with gold foil and Caribbean Sea blue foil (for the dots that cross the A and top the J, plus her tag line, “Fine Floral & Event Decor”) that would shimmer and shine. Then I told her about edge painting.

It was a crazy scramble to collect all the things we would need to make these cards and ship them to her in time. Edge painting for the show was out of the question, but guess what…we got the cards to her AND the rack cards in record time. This black letterpress card with foil stamping and edge painting has resulted in much attention to the new shop, which features Jenn’s gorgeous floral arrangements and wedding and event decor rentals,  like candelabra, furniture, tabletop and accessories for big events and small.

The first shipment of cards arrived in the nick of time for her show, but of course they had black edges, not salmon pink. The remainder of the cards got shipped to the edge painters and then to Jenn a bit later, in time for her next show. According to Jenn, people are stopped in their tracks by these beautiful cards. This is the point. This is what we go for. Will the business card do the job of making you and your business memorable.

Successfully utilizing the spectacular latent power of a great business card’s potential is not so much about the cost per card, nor is it in the amount of time from conception to completion that is the main question. It is really about what is my business card doing for me and my business. Is it the ambassador I want out there working for me, doing the delicate diplomatic work of reminding potential clients to call me up and give me a job. Jenn’s cards are so unusual, so fabulously amazing that people won’t put them in their purses. They ask permission to keep them. They want to talk about how the logo looks like a chandelier or the Eiffel Tower or a tent, and how perfect and how fun, etc. They are little pieces of art that speak volumes about Jenn’s taste and attention to detail and her giant store of creativity. Yes, each card costs over a dollar, but if that dollar brings in a $1000, or $3000, or more job, what is the value of that card, that dollar? Priceless.

Jenn is so much fun to work with that I often call her up in the morning and have coffee with her over the phone. Sometimes I send her an email at 11 o’clock at night and she is still up…3 hours later in South Carolina…answering my email. She is amazing and funny and we have developed a friendship in a short span of time that I can hardly imagine happening…about as fast as the business card concept came to me, we are friends.

I love this business. I love the modern world that allows things like this to happen. I love the creative trance that brings such beauty and effectiveness for my clients’ work. There is no other process that is capable of accomplishing a card like this: only letterpress can print on this type of paper, and only a great deal of skill and experience can even begin to attempt the technical aspects of it.

When I show people these cards, they literally gasp. They turn them over and handle them, rub their fingers over the impression, turn them on their sides to admire the little flash of color. It is like a magic trick. Stunning. This is what we want to see in a business card. This is the real work a business card needs to do.

Next time, I will show you Jenn’s rack cards, and all the stationery and envelopes and other things we are making for her right now.

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Hiram Trillo, a Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, photographer with award-winning style, sent us this photo shoot of his new business cards and other branding elements we produced for him here at Studio Z Mendocino. The square business cards, with Hiram’s iconic monogram printed on our favorite Cranes Lettra 600 gram, super-thick cover stock in a water-colored metallic foil (if your water is the Caribbean), and letterpressed black ink, like the photographs he takes, change mood, hue and tone according to lighting and angle.

In Hiram’s own words:

Since I can remember, I always wanted my own business and business cards. To me a business card speaks volumes; once in a while you find that perfect match.  To us, Studio-Z was that match.  Zida Borcich is an incredible individual that just clicked. Zida and her team took the time to understand what we wanted and designed a business card that defined our studio.  She took it one step further and designed envelopes, letterheads, and thank you cards.

2009 was an incredible year for us. We had a our first magazine feature in Bodas USA, we worked with some amazing couples, had our first magazine shoot with Brides of North Texas, were featured photographer of the month on the PhotoBiz Blog, met some amazing photographers, assisted JVS and Anne with their lighting workshops, and, to finish the year with a bang, we have been nominated for photographer of the year by PhotoBiz.  This is a great honor for us to be categorized with some incredible photographers. This is an open competition so any one can vote.  We appreciate all votes and spreading the word.

The cards, as well as the rest of the stuff, make our logo stand out in a beautiful sea of blue foil — a literal reflection of our work.  I wish I had the words to describe how happy we are with the final product, but since we are photographers — and a photograph is worth a thousand words — here they are…

This was a book Hiram’s father gave to him, “Misterio del Hombre”

He said the blue foil looked just like the colors in this favorite old book and he just had to use it in this shoot.


It was a great pleasure to work with Hiram through the entire process of creating his stationery wardrobe. We are so happy with the results and with his wonderful and enthusiastic response to it all. Thank you, Hiram. Your work is beautiful, and we wish you every good thing in the coming new year and decade. We strive always to make business cards and stationery that reflect that level of uniqueness, quality and artfulness. We are so happy to know you and to have had the good fortune to work with you.

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Tim Sohn, a wonderful SF photographer, just sent us these incredible photos and these very kind words about the business cards and stationery we just designed and printed for him.

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“’Wow! This is nice!’ That’s the reaction I get every time I hand out one of these beautiful letterpress business cards designed by Zida Borcich over at Studio Z Mendocino. Several months ago I started to explore rebranding Tim Sohn Studios and knew that there were two things I wanted – a new logo to represent our style of photography and stunning business cards that would reflect our commitment to high quality products and services. One day I happened to stumble upon Zida’s blog and saw her amazing work on other business cards. When I spoke with her over the phone, she understood exactly what I was looking for and there was no doubt she would deliver an amazing logo design and business card. The logo is in the symbol of an “S” for Sohn. The two circles represent wedding bands that are being joined together. The design was so good, I went ahead and ordered script cards and envelopes to match.

I’m so excited to hand these cards out. If you see me around, be sure to ask me for one. You have to feel it!”

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Here are his Script Cards, which he can use as thank you notes, invitations to coffee, to paper clip to a bunch of proofs. They fit into his #10 Envelopes and are useful in a million ways.

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We printed Tim’s business cards on 600 gram Cranes Lettra and his script cards on 300 gram Lettra. The extra huge square flap envelopes are Cranes Crest, all in Flourescent White. We love the soft, fluffy texture that takes the bite of letterpress so beautifully. Happy note writing, Tim. From experience, we know that when people receive their script cards and other thank you notes, there is a gigantic spike in thank you note writing. You just can’t help wanting to express your gratitude on such amazing paper. Thank you, Tim. It was our pleasure to work with you. Z

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